II. Outline of Results

1 Number and mean size of households

(1) Number of households

The total number of households shows an 11 percent increase throughout the nation during the period 1995-2020. At the prefectural level, the number of households increases in many prefectures, while the number decreases in six prefectures: Tokyo (-5%), Akita (-3%), Yamaguchi (-3%), Shimane (-2%), Kochi (-2%), and Nagasaki (-1%) (Chart 1, Table 1). The largest increases in the number of households were in Okinawa (39%), Shiga (37%), and Saitama (36%).

During the whole 25-year period, the number of households tends to increase more or less. However, when the trend at intervals of five years is considered, during the period 2005-2010, as many as eight prefectures(Osaka, Oita, and the six prefectures mentioned above) showed drops in the number; then, during the period 2010-2015, the number of households decreases in 22 prefectures, which corresponds to nearly half of the 47 prefectures. In addition, during the period between 2015 and 2020, the reduction in the number of households will spread over 32 prefectures, which includes two-thirds the entire nation. On the other hand, the number of households is increasing in 15 prefectures: Miyagi, Fukushima, Ibaraki, Tochigi, Gunma, Saitama, Chiba, Yamanashi, Nagano, Gifu, Mie, Shiga, Nara, Fukuoka, and Okinawa. However, the scale of the increases in Fukushima, Gunma, Gifu, and Fukuoka are close to zero.

When the number of households is analyzed by regional blocks , it increases in all of the blocks between 1995 and 2020. The Okinawa region (39%) as well as the northern Kanto region (22%) show especially dramatic increases in the number of households (Table 2). Moreover, the Nagoya Area (15%) and the Tokyo Area (13%) show a large increase. On the contrary, the Shikoku region (2.1%) and the Hokkaido region (3.7%) show a small increase. Considering the trend in the number of households at intervals of five years, some regions start showing a reduction in 2010-2015, and the only region to show an increase will be Okinawa during the period 2015-2020, suggesting other prefectures will be decreasing.

(2) Mean size of households

The mean size of a household has the following overall trend. Although the number is low in large urban areas, the numbers throughout the Tohoku region and the Chubu region, as well as the western Japan region on the side of the Japan Sea are generally high. This trend seems to stay the same, however, the number will decrease in all prefectures consistently until the year of 2020 (Table 3, Chart 2).

In 1995 (2.82 people for the national average), the highest number of people per household, 3.45, was seen in Yamagata, while Tokyo showed the lowest number of people per household, 2.06. By 2020, the mean size of household will be less than three people in all prefectures.

2 Number and proportion of households by family type

(1) Number of households by family type

[One-person households] (Tables 4-1 and 5-1)

During the period between 1995 and 2020, the number of one-person households increases in all prefectures except Tokyo. The range of increase varies from about 20 to 80%. Prefectures showing an especially high percentage of increase are: Okinawa (83%), Nara (79%), Shiga (73%), Saitama (65%), and Ibaraki (62%). This indicates a tendency that if the proportion of one-person households in a prefecture is currently low, the prefecture would experience a prominent increase in the proportion in the future. Considering the trend at five-year intervals, Tokyo will see a reduction in the proportion of one-person households during the period 2005-2010. Subsequently, Kagoshima, Kochi, Nagasaki, and Yamaguchi will also see a reduction in the proportion by 2020.

In terms of regional blocks, the rates of increase in the number of one-person households are high in the following blocks: Okinawa region (83%), Chubu region (38%), Tohoku region (35%), and Kinki region (34%). Among these, the Okinawa region and the Chubu region show a larger increase.

[Couple-only] (Tables 4-2 and 5-2)

All prefectures show an increase in the number of couple-only households between 1995 and 2020. In particular, the following prefectures display a large increase: Okinawa (90%), Shiga (86%), Saitama (83%), Ibaraki (78%), and Chiba (72%). This indicates a pattern in which prefectures with a low percentage in the current number of households of this type tend to have large increases in the proportion in the future. In terms of the trend at five-year intervals, we start to observe a reduction in the number of couple-only households in certain prefectures after the year 2010. During the period between 2015 and 2020, reductions are seen in 22 prefectures, which are mostly in southern Japan. When a prefecture experiences a reduction between 2010 and 2015, it tends to show a larger percentage in the reduction during the next period.

When the trend is examined by regional blocks, the following regions show a large increase during the period of 1995-2020: Okinawa (90%); Kanto (35%); Chubu (48%); and Kinki (37%). The lowest increase is seen in the Shikoku region (18%). The only regions with continuous increases between 2015 and 2020 are: Okinawa, Chubu, and Tohoku. In the Kanto region, although the increase is seen only in the northern Kanto block, the Tokyo Area shows a reduction. Therefore, the trend in Kanto looks flat.

[Couple-and-children] (Tables 4-3 and 5-3)

The number of households of couple-and-children starts decreasing in many prefectures after 1995. During the period 1995-2020, 42 prefectures show a decreasing trend. Even among five prefectures with an increasing trend, only Shiga (12%) exceeds a 3% increase. The other four prefectures of Okinawa (3%), Saitama (2%), Yamanashi (2%), and Ibaraki (1%), show less than a 3% increase.

Prefectures with a large percentage reduction in the number of couple-and-children are: Tokyo (-28%), Osaka (-28%), Yamaguchi (-24%), Nagasaki (-24%), Akita (-22%), Kochi (-22%), Kagoshima (-21%), Hokkaido (-21%), and Ehime (-20%). All prefectures except Shiga will experience a decrease in the number of this family type during 2015-2020, while the number of prefectures with a trend of a reduction in this family type is 36 during 1995-2000. It is not seen in the one-person households and couple-only households that with the current large number of married households with children, the prefecture is also going to have a large increase in the future percentage of the family type.

In terms of regional blocks, during the period 1995-2020, all regions except the Okinawa region experience a decrease in this family type. The first half of the period of the projection analysis shows an increasing trend for this family type, not only in the Okinawa region but also in the Kanto region. During the period 2010-2015, all regions including the Okinawa region show a reduction of this family type.

[Parent-and-children households] (Tables 4-4 and 5-4)

During the period 1995-2020, the number of parent-and-children households shows an increase in all prefectures. The growth rate is large in Shiga (99%), Saitama (86%), Chiba (76%), Ibaraki (75%), and Nara (74%). These prefectures also show high increases in the numbers of one-person households and couple-only households. For the trend at intervals of five years, eight prefectures show reductions during the period 2015-2020.

In terms of regional blocks, during the period 1995-2020, high increase rates are seen in the Okinawa region (64%), the Kanto region (58%), and the Chubu region (57%). Considerable increase rates are observed in the northern Kanto block (65%) in the Kanto region as well as in the Nagoya Area (61%) in the Chubu region.

[Other households] (Tables 4-5 and 5-5)

During 1995-2020, 42 prefectures show reductions of other households except for five prefectures: Saitama (increase rate of 19%), Okinawa (9%), Chiba (4%), Kanagawa (3%), and Shiga (less than 1%). Among these, Saitama, Shiga, and Okinawa continue to show slight increases even during the period 2015-2020. These prefectures currently hold a relatively large number of other households. On the other hand, large reductions are seen in Shimane (-32%), Kochi (-31%), Akita (-30%), Oita (-29%), Ehime (-28%), Tokushima (-28%), Nagasaki (-27%), Tottori (-27%), Iwate (-27%), Yamagata (-26%), and Wakayama (-25%).

In terms of regional blocks, all regions except the Okinawa region show a reduction in the number of other households during 1995-2020. However, among Kanto regional blocks, the northern Kanto block decreases (-9%) while the Tokyo Area slightly increases (0.5%). This Tokyo Areafs trend continues until 2010. Afterwards, all regional blocks except the Okinawa region decrease.

(2) Proportion of households by family type

[One-person households] (Tables 6-1 and 7-1)

During the period 1995-2020, the proportion of one-person households increases in all prefectures. For the trend at intervals of five years, all prefectures consistently increase in proportion, except Tokyo which shows a small reduction until 2010. The proportion of one-person households in 1995 has a range between 17.6% (Yamagata) and 29.0% (Kyoto) with the exception of an especially high proportion in Tokyo (38.1%). In 2020, the proportion increases across the prefectures up to a range between 24.1% (Yamagata and Gifu) and 33.3% (Osaka) except in Tokyo (38.9%). Tokyo consistently shows the highest proportion.

In 1995, the national proportion of one-person households (25.6%) is exceeded by the proportion of the following prefectures: Tokyo (38.1%), Kyoto (29.0%), Kanagawa (28.3%), Hokkaido (27.9%), Kagoshima (27.7%), Fukuoka (27.6%), Osaka (27.4%), Miyagi (26.9%), Kochi (26.9%), and Hiroshima (26.3%). In 2020 (national proportion: 29.7%), these prefectures respectively show increases to 38.9%, 32.0%, 30.7%, 32.8%, 33.2%, 31.5%, 33.3%, 29.6%, 33.0%, and 30.7%. Moreover, in 2020, the national proportion is exceeded by the proportion of these prefectures as well: Yamaguchi (30.3%), Ehime (30.0%), Miyazaki (29.8%), and Oita (29.7%).

[Couple-only] (Tables 6-1 and 7-1)

During the period 1995-2020, all prefectures show increases in the proportion of couple-only households. In particular, the proportion in eastern Japan displays a remarkable increase. In 1995 (national proportion: 17.4%), the proportion stays in the range between 12.2% (Okinawa) and 23.8% (Kagoshima). In 2020 (national proportion: 21.9%), the range of the proportion increases to 16.7% (Okinawa) and 25.7% (Hokkaido).

In 1995, except for Hokkaido (22.4%), high proportions of couple-only households are seen in prefectures of southern Japan, such as Kagoshima (23.8%), Yamaguchi (22.7%), Miyazaki (22.2%), Ehime (21.5%), Oita (21.2%), and Kochi (21.1%). Even in 2020, except for Hokkaido (25.7%), the national proportion is exceeded in these prefectures in southern Japan: Miyazaki (25.2%), Kagoshima (25.2%), Yamaguchi (25.1%), Oita (24.7%), and Ehime (24.6%). Kagoshima shows the highest proportion in 1995, while Hokkaido takes over the top position after 2005.

[Couple-and-children] (Tables 6-2 and 7-2)

During the period 1995-2020, the proportion of couple-and-children households decreases in all prefectures. In 1995 (national proportion: 34.2%), the proportions stay in the range between 24.4% (Yamagata) and 43.5% (Saitama). In 2020 (national proportion: 26.7%), the proportions fall to between 20.5% (Akita and Yamagata) and 32.6% (Saitama).

In 1995, relatively high proportions are seen in the Chubu region, the Kinki region, and the Kanto region, except for Tokyo, such as in Saitama (43.5%), Okinawa (41.6%), Nara (40.0%), Chiba (39.9%), Kanagawa (38.8%), Osaka (37.8%), Hyogo (37.7%), and Aichi (37.0%). This trend continues and results in excess of the national proportion in 2020 in most of these prefectures (respectively, their proportions change to 32.6%, 30.8%, 30.2%, 30.7%, 29.3%, 27.3%, 28.2%, and 28.5%). The proportion in Saitama is consistently the highest throughout the period.

[Parent-and-children households] (Tables 6-2 and 7-2)

During the period 1995-2020, the proportion of parent-and-children households increases in all prefectures. In particular, eastern Japan shows a prominent increase in the proportion. In 1995 (national proportion: 7.1%), except for the especially high proportion in Okinawa (11.7%), the proportions stay in the range between 5.8% (Shiga) and 8.8% (Aomori). In 2020 (national proportion: 9.5%), except for Okinawa (13.8%), the range is between 8.4% (Ishikawa, Fukui, Gifu, and Shiga) and 10.6% (Fukuoka), which especially indicates that the bottom of the range increased sharply. The highest proportion is consistently shown in Okinawa until 2020. On the contrary, the Chubu region shows consistency with the lowest proportion.

[Other households] (Tables 6-3 and 7-3)

All prefectures continue to experience a reduction in the proportion of other households until 2020. In 1995 (national proportion: 15.7%), except for the especially high proportion in Yamagata (37.5%), the proportions settle in a range between 7.9% (Tokyo) and 31.4% (Akita and Toyama). In 2020 (national range: 12.2%), Yamagata experiences a reduction in the proportion to 26.6%, and the proportions of other prefectures decrease to a range between 6.7% (Kagoshima) and 22.8% (Toyama and Fukui). Even though Yamagata consistently shows the highest proportion, it decreases more than ten percent-points during 1995-2020.

In 1995, the proportions are higher in prefectures in the Tohoku and Hokuriku regions especially along the Sea of Japan, such as in Yamagata (37.5%), Akita (31.4%), Toyama (31.4%), Fukui (31.3%), and Niigata (30.2%). These prefectures respectively are still showing high proportions of 26.6%, 22.6%, 22.8%, 22.8%, and 22.0%. Moreover, the prefectures with low proportions in 1995, such as Tokyo (7.9%), Kagoshima (8.6%), Kanagawa (9.4%), Osaka (9.4%), and Hokkaido (10.8%), also maintain low levels even in 2020, with 6.8%, 6.7%, 8.4%, 7.5%, and 8.0%, respectively. In 1995, the lowest proportion is shown in Tokyo, while in 2020, Kagoshima takes over the position with a slightly lower proportion than that of Tokyo.

According to national estimates, in terms of family type, the proportion of couple-and-children households (34.2%) is the highest in 1995. The proportion of one-person households (25.6%) is second highest. However, this order changes over in 2013, which makes the proportion of one-person households the dominant family type. In 2020, the proportion of one-person households becomes 29.7% and the proportion of couple-and-children households becomes 26.7%. It should also be mentioned that the proportion of couple-only households (17.4% (1995) --> 21.9% (2020)) continues to remain the third highest family type.

In terms of the most dominant family type by prefecture, couple-and-children households are the largest in 38 prefectures in 1995. Likewise, the other households are dominant in the other eight prefectures, and one-person households occupy the highest proportion in Tokyo. This trend changes in 2020: One-person households become the most dominant family type in 35 prefectures. The number of prefectures in which the proportion of couple-and-children households is dominant decreases from 35 to 11, and only one prefecture shows other households as the most dominant family type (Chart 3, Table 8). In 2020, Yamagata becomes the only prefecture in which the other households is the largest family type.

Moreover, the second largest family type in 1995 is one-person in 24 prefectures, other household in 13 prefectures, couple-and-children in nine prefectures, and couple-only in one prefecture. In 2020, the second largest family type is couple-and-children in 27 prefectures, one-person in 12 prefectures, couple-only in seven prefectures, and other households in one prefecture.

When the results are sorted by family type, the number of prefectures in which one-person households occupy the largest or the second largest portion increases from 25 in 1995 to 47 in 2020. In the same way, the number of prefectures in which couple-only households are the second or third dominant family type increases from 19 in 1995 to 43 in 2020, becoming more important. On the contrary, although couple-and-children is the most dominant or second largest family type in all prefectures in 1995, the number of prefectures is reduced to 38 in 2020. In nine prefectures, the ranking of this family type drops to third or even lower in 2020. Moreover, although the total number of prefectures in which other households are reported to be the third is 28 in 1995, in 2020, the number reduces to only five. It becomes largest in one prefecture; second largest in one prefecture; and third largest in three prefectures.

3. Elderly households

(1) Number of elderly households

The total number of elderly households (in which the heads are 65 years old or more) increases in all prefectures during 1995-2020 (Table 9, Chart 4). However, the rate of increase is gradually diminishing: During the period 1995-2020, the total number of elderly households increases more than 20% in many prefectures; however, during the period 2015-2020, the percentage decreases to 5% around southern Japan. Osaka, Tokyo, and Kochi show slight reductions in the rate of increase during the period 2015-2020.

In the period 1995-2020, the proportion of increase in the number of elderly households shows the largest leap in Saitama (211%). Accordingly, the number of elderly households in 1995 triples by 2020. Otherwise, the rate of increase is more than 100% in 12 prefectures such as Chiba (181%), Kanagawa (150%), Okinawa (135%), Ibaraki (133%), Aichi (131%), Nara (131%), Shiga (121%), Hyogo (114%), Osaka (110%), Tochigi (108%), Shizuoka (105%), and Miyagi (103%). Among these, Okinawa marks the highest increase during the period 2015-2020. Moreover, Kagoshima shows the lowest increase rate, 40%, during the period 1995-2020.

In terms of he regional blocks, during the period 1995-2020, Okinawa (135%) and Kanto (133%) regions show large increases in the number of elderly households (Table 10). In the Kanto region, the Tokyo area shows an especially high increase rate (140%). Otherwise, the Nagoya area in the Chubu region (114%), the Kinki region (108%), and the Kansai region (110%) also exceed and increase rate of 100%. Although the rate of increase shows a gradual diminution, all of the regional blocks consistently experience an increase in the number of elderly households.

Among elderly households, those in which the head is 75 years old or more increases in all prefectures during the period 1995-2020 (Table 11). The rate of increase is higher than that for all elderly households and also exceeds 30% in most prefectures during the period 1995-2000. However, during the period 2015-2020, the rate of increase diminishes gradually as elderly households reduce in number. The number decreases in the following prefectures: Akita (-1%), Shimane (-2%), Nagasaki (-1%), and Kagoshima (-5%).

During the period 1995-2020, the rate of increase shows the highest number in Saitama (382%). Also, the rates in the following 11 prefectures are reported to exceed 200%: Chiba (334%), Kanagawa (293%), Aichi (255%), Nara (252%), Ibaraki (237%), Hyogo (225%), Osaka (224%), Shiga / Shizuoka (214%), Miyagi (203%), and Hokkaido (201%). Although Kagoshima displays the lowest increase, which is reported to be 86%, it is still considered to be high.

Interms of regional blocks, Kanto (248%), Kinki (211%), Hokkaido (201%), and Okinawa (200%) show more than a 200% increase (Table 12). In the Kanto region, the Tokyo area shows an especially high increase rate (261%). In addition, although the Chubu region as a whole does not indicate more than a 200% increase rate, the percentage in the Nagoya area exceeds 200% (225%).

The proportion of elderly households in the total number of households increases from 19.7% (1995) to 35.2% (2020) in terms of national estimates. When prefectures are considered, the proportions of elderly households in large city areas, Hokkaido, and Okinawa are lower than 20% (the lowest proportion is 13.8% in Saitama). Otherwise, the proportions of other prefectures are generally around 25%. Among these, Kagoshima shows the largest proportion at 29.7% (Table 13, Chart 5). In 2020, the proportions of all prefectures exceed 30% and especially the proportions of these seven prefectures exceed 40%: Akita (42.8%), Yamaguchi (42.4%), Shimane (42.1%), Kochi (41.1%), Kagoshima (41.0%), Yamagata (40.9%), and Toyama (40.1%). The regional trend in 1995 is mostly maintained until 2020, although population at the centers of large cities such as Tokyo (17.6% --> 35.9%) and Osaka (17.1% --> 35.8%) is aging.

In terms of regional blocks, the Shikoku region (25.5%) has the highest proportion of elderly households. Likewise, the high percentage of elderly households is seen in Chugoku (24.4%), Kyushu (24.0%), Hokuriku (23.9%), and Tohoku (23.3%). These regions continue to display high proportions in 2020 of 39.5%, 38.5%, 37.0%, 37.6%, and 36.4%, respectively (Table 14). The percentage also increases in other regions and results in a level of more than 30% in all regional blocks. In particular, the Tokyo area doubles the proportion from 15.8% in 1995 to 33.4% in 2020.

Among elderly households, the prefecture-specific proportions of households in which the head is 75 years old or more generally stay around 30-35%. The proportions tend to increase in all prefectures and in 2020, the overall range of the proportions is observed to be around 45-50% (Tables 15 and 16). In particular, in 2020, nine prefectures show more than 50% in the proportion: Kagoshima (52.4%), Tokyo (51.9%), Wakayama (51.1%), Yamaguchi (51.0%), Kochi (50.7%), Hiroshima (50.6%), Kyoto (50.3%), Osaka (50.3%), and Ehime (50.1%). The increase is clearly seen in large cities such as Tokyo and Osaka.

In 1995, this proportion tends to increase in the Okinawa, Chugoku, Shikoku, and Kyushu regions. In 2020, the same trend is also seen in the Hokkaido, Tokyo, Nagoya, and Kinki regions.

(2) Number and proportion of elderly households by family type

When family types are considered for elderly households, all prefectures show an increase of one-person, couple-only, couple-and-children, and parent-and-children households during 1995-2020 (Tables 17-1~17-4, 18-1~18-4). The other households decrease only in Yamaguchi and Shimane, while the other 45 prefectures tend to experience increases (Tables 17-5 and 18-5). In particular, the increment percentage of one-person households displays more than 100% in 34 prefectures around eastern Japan and the Kinki region for the 25 years. Among these, the growth rates in 16 prefectures are more than the national rate (144%). The high increment rate is especially seen in Saitama (321%) and Chiba (271%) in the Kanto region where a high increment rate is also reported at 190%.

Considering the trend at intervals of five years, the one-person and parent-and-children households consistently increase in all prefectures. However, the percentage increase gradually decreases over time. The number of couple-only and couple-and-children also increases in all prefectures until 2015. Afterwards, the number of these households starts to decrease in seven prefectures and in 16 prefectures, respectively, in 2015. The other households decrease in prefectures of Chubu, Kinki, Chugoku, Shikoku regions, while Japan as a whole shows a 1% increase in the number during the period 2015-2020.

The proportion of one-person households among elderly households increases from 14.6 % (Yamagata)-37.3% (Kagoshima) in 1995 to 21.4% (Yamagata)-40.8% (Kagoshima) in 2020 (Table 19-1, Chart 6). In 2020, 23 prefectures in the Hokkaido, Tokyo, and western Japan regions tend to show high increment proportions of more than 30%, including Kagoshima with 40.8%. During the period 1995-2020, the proportion increases in all prefectures. In the eastern Japan area, in particular, the proportion of one-person households increases sharply. In terms of regional blocks, the highest proportion is seen in the Kansai region (30.3%) for the year 1995 and the Hokkaido region (36.3%) for the year 2020 (Table 20-1). Moreover, the Tohoku region, in which the lowest proportion of one-person households is reported, even shows a proportion of over 25% in 2020. This means that one out of four one-person households in the Tohoku region is elderly.

During 1995-2020, the proportion of elderly couple-only households shifts from 22.2% (Yamagata)-45.0% (Hokkaido) to 28.3% (Okinawa)-39.5% (Hokkaido). In 2020, the highest proportion seen in Hokkaido is even less than 40% (Table 19-1). During the period, 28 prefectures around the Tohoku, Hokuriku, and Chubu regions experience an increase in the proportion of elderly couple-only households. On the other hand, the Hokkaido and southern Japan region, as well as the large cities, tend to decrease in proportion. In terms of regional blocks, the highest and lowest proportions are respectively seen in the Hokkaido and Okinawa region throughout the period (Table 20-1).

The proportions of elderly couple-and-children households during the period 1995-2020 shift in the range from 8.4% (Tokushima, Oita, and Kagoshima) to 18.3% (Okinawa) to a range of 9.5% (Yamaguchi and Kagoshima) to 15.8% (Saitama and Okinawa). Except for Okinawa, high proportions are clearly seen in the Tohoku and Kanto regions (Table 19-2). During this period, 35 prefectures experience increases in proportions, while the large cities and Okinawa have decreases. Moreover, in the last period of the projections between 2015 and 2020, some prefectures show increases in the proportion, while all regional blocks show reductions (Table 20-2).

The proportion of elderly parent-and-children households during the period 1995-2020 changes from a range from 3.8% (Fukui) to 12.0% (Okinawa) to a range of 5.0% (Fukui) to 11.1% (Okinawa). During this period, all prefectures except Okinawa show increases in proportions (Table 19-2). In 2020, the proportions become high in these prefectures, with the exception of Okinawa: Tokyo (9.1%), Kanagawa (8.3%), and Fukuoka (8.3%). In terms of regional blocks, a relatively sharp increase in the proportion of elderly parent-and-children households during this period is observed in the Hokkaido (5.6% (1995) --> 6.8% (2020)) and Hokuriku (3.9% (1995) --> 5.1% (2020)) regions, while the Tokyo area displays a relatively small transition (7.9% (1995) --> 8.1% (2020)).

The proportions of other households among elderly households during the period 1995-2020 all decrease from a range of 7.4% (Kagoshima) to 48.8% (Yamagata) to a range of 6.8% (Kagoshima) to 32.4% (Yamagata) (Table 19-3). Yamagata shows the highest level throughout the period (48.8% --> 32.4%). The next highest level is seen in the following prefectures: Fukui (44.1%), Toyama (44.0%), Niigata (42.7%), and Akita (40.0%). These prefecturesf levels also continue in 2020 (respectively, 30.0%, 29.6%, 28.6%, and 26.9%). On the other hand, the lowest levels are seen in the following prefectures: Kagoshima (7.4% (1995) --> 6.3% (2020)), Hokkaido (10.2% --> 7.4%), Tokyo (10.9% --> 8.5%), Osaka (11.4% --> 8.6%), Miyazaki (12.3% --> 9.3%), and Kochi (13.3% --> 9.7%). During the period 1995-2020, the proportions of other households in elderly households are decreasing in all prefectures. In particular, the reduction in the proportion of those in eastern Japan is relatively large. In terms of regional blocks (Table 20-3), all regions show reductions in the proportion. The Tohoku region, with the highest proportion, shows a reduction from 38.0% (1995) to 25.0% (2020), which is comparable with the proportion of one-person households (25.1%).


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